Education

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

This panel considers Social Reproduction Theory in relation to the 99% Women's Strike of March 8, 2018, and the ensuing uprisings by teachers, primarily women, in the Right to Work states that started in 2018 and continue at this writing. What is Social Reproduction Theory? How does SRT contribute to Marxist analysis? How does the ideology of the Women's Strike contribute to a feminism that represents working class women and that challenges the mainstream feminism of pussy hats? How do we explain the new consciousness of political power that imbues the teacher walkouts? The conventional wisdom is that Democrats embody feminist ideology while Republicans oppose it. But are we looking at a new feminist formation in the US that is closer to the women's movements in Latin America such as the "Not One More" campaign against violence in Argentina and the mobilization against abortion restrictions in Poland? What is the relationship between this feminism of the 99% and the new consciousness among Marxist analysts that social reproduction and the attacks on the capacity to live and work in a period of extreme austerity are as central to social movement organizing as the traditional workplace based strikes and other forms of resistance.

Location: 
NYC
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Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Teachers and communities in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Arizona, Kentucky, Jersey City, Chicago, Puerto Rico, New York, and elsewhere are mobilizing against aggressive attacks on overall public school budgets, leading to crumbling infrastructures, depleted resources, and poorly paid staff. Educators understand how their poor working conditions are linked to poor learning conditions. Disinvestment is part of a plan to undermine public education and make way for privatization through voucher programs and charterization (public funds to privately operated schools with little to no oversight or accountability). Both major parties are largely united behind this “educational reform” agenda. In New York, it uses high-stakes testing to punish students, teachers, and schools in high-poverty districts for predictably scoring low on standardized tests. Their public schools are then closed as “failing” and replaced with privately-managed charter schools. A whole new profit center has been created by wealthy investors to make money in the testing and charter school industries. These same wealthy interests promote candidates and lobbying groups that advocate cuts to high-bracket taxes, public school funding, and the rights of teachers’ unions. This test-punish-and-privatize agenda has become the substitute for desegregating and fully funding public schools, the only education reform that has really worked to radically close achievement gaps. Desegregation by race and class has also improved education for students of all backgrounds, who do better in terms intellectual self-confidence, leadership, creativity, problem-solving, collaboration, and tolerance. But spurred by a series of court decisions since the 1970s that have increasingly approved segregation in fact as long as it isn’t segregation codified by law, segregation continues to grow, especially in New York where schools are now the most segregated in the nation, with two-thirds of black students attending schools that are at least 90% minority. How have these policies played out in New York? What are communities doing to identify these issues and fight for public voice and agency in the kind of education they want? This panel will discuss organizing for a progressive education reform agenda based on equitable and adequate school funding, an end to high-stakes testing and privatization, and a gifted-quality education for every child.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Labor insurgencies in West Virginia, Oklahoma, and beyond gave us a glimpse at what workers can achieve when organized and united in solidarity.

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This workshop will ask participants to look at how they focus on their core values while expanding their organizations. What practices do they use to stay intentional when welcoming new alliances to their actions? How does their group convey their values while allowing for difference?

The workshop is participant-oriented. Early exercises determine the issues while the breakout session concentrates on identifying and sharing non-patriarchal solutions. Breakout sessions might include topics such as integration, diversity, limits, inclusion, and others. Time will be left at the end for a summary of solutions!

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

This panel will include the following four sections. First, Columbia University's teacher training co-director, Suzanne Pratt, will describe the TR@TC2 program, its goals and purposes. Second, Rebecca Stanton, a classroom teacher of record at Manhattan's Community Health Academy of the Heights will outline the intersections across theory and practice, and demonstrate instructional methods designed to engage immigrant students and encourage their voices. Next, selected high-school students and their tutors will present projects related to social justice topics of their choice. Finally, the panel will close with a question and answer segment. This panel will be of particular interest to current and entering teachers, school administrators, students, their families, as well as anyone interested in supporting immigrant students.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

VT Senator Bernie Sanders repeatedly declared during his presidential campaign that the 'The American people are profoundly sick and tired of establishment economics.' Whatever you think about Sanders, this statement nails it. But establishment economics has claws and fights back. Intolerance Economics: Ideology, Competing Visions and Institutional Retaliation will bring into focus the latest resistance to establishment economics and the forces of reaction against change to a long calcified doctrine that has one ideological purpose -- servicing the corporate status quo.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

How will climate change affect our lives? Where will its impacts be most deeply felt? Are we doing enough to protect ourselves from the coming chaos? Cities are ground zero for climate change, contributing the lion’s share of carbon to the atmosphere, while also lying on the frontlines of rising sea levels. Today, the majority of the world’s megacities are located in coastal zones, yet few of them are adequately prepared for the floods that will increasingly menace their shores. This panel will consider what's at stake globally for the most vulnerable communities who are are already feeling the impacts of climate change.

Scientists are predicting that as the southern hemisphere heats up the number of people migrating to the EU each year will triple. How can we link the struggles against neoliberalism, austerity, high housing costs and gentrification, with support for the rights of free movement across borders, for migrants displaced by the effects of climate change, and for environmental justice? What can we learn from urban movements already fighting to remake our cities in a more just and equitable way?

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

We are PhD students working in the realm of immigration with diverse positionalities, disciplines, methodologies, levels of focus, and research contexts, as well as traditionally understood identities (race and ethnicity, languages spoken, gender expression, country of origin). Our Moderated Dialogue embodies an anti-hierarchical, Bakhtinian approach to scholarship as an ongoing, polyphonic, future-making collaboration, signifying a disruption to traditional academic authority. As emerging immigration scholars with a variety of experiences, commitments, and visions in our work, we propose a transdisciplinary challenge to paternalistic, U.S.-centric ways of doing immigration scholarship. We will present our diverse research, which takes place across three continents, and identify key topics to be discussed, including the dialectics of local and transnational positionality, racialization and racialized experiences across borders, the complex relationship between sending and receiving countries, ethics in nonprofit education, and the complexities of volunteerism and national identity. This strategic project is an extension of our already powerful dialogical work as colleagues, and we look forward to sharing this radical methodology of knowledge production to inspire new, dynamic ways of approaching scholarship as a shared, transformative experience that values all voices and visions.