Media

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Resistance to the carceral state has always been at the forefront of Leftist agendas. More specifically, the exercise of weaponized violence calls to question the role that the police play in constructing an “American” cultural identity. This panel raises key questions: what spaces and places do, and will, policing/law enforcement agencies occupy in an ongoing process of building a new global Left, as their material and cultural reach and ramifications continue to escalate and accelerate exponentially? Why/ do we need law enforcement? How do we begin to understand social imperatives of policing beyond the work of local enforcement agencies, but also an act culturally embedded into quotidian American life? How do oppositional communities connect across differently resourced and governed spaces to work with or within what some consider protracted, multifaceted genocide?

This discussion features dialogue between activist-scholars across disciplines engaging attendees around discourses of prison and policing reform, abolition, and restorative justice- and the obstacles and promises of inhabiting and contributing toward each. Drawing from works in digital humanities, communication, critical race/ethnic studies, and community activism, this panel seeks to critically examine the stakes of addressing policing in the New World, and what this may look like among different spaces that comprise the global Left.

Kim Clark, Art Culture Movement, FREE! Families Rally for Emancipation and Empowerment will share a ten-minute clip from a 2018 public access TV program entitled No Place for Police (produced collaboratively by Clark and Jones), which highlights challenges with policing and police violence in schools, and will engage more broadly in interrogating what the proper place of police is in our local communities, and how this points toward possibilities for radical transnational (or broader) solidarities.

Aundrey Jones, UC San Diego, Ethnic Studies, Pillars of the Community, All of Us or None: will cover a broad history of carceral resistance in Southern California. Looking at different collectives of Left organizing as it relates specifically to Black/Brown people in Los Angeles since WWII, and how these communities have constructed meanings of life and struggle while living under the precarious auspices of carceral Los Angeles.

Kathie Cheng, Stolen Lives Project, will discuss ways the Stolen Lives Project has been documenting those killed by U.S. law enforcement since 1996. How does this work counter normalized narratives which justify police/state violence by providing stories and data that challenge and reframe rarely adequately investigated or made known circumstances surrounding the deaths of their victims? Through these narratives, the SLP illustrates how police brutality is normalized and constructed as expected and acceptable through mainstream media’s tarnishing of victim reputations, despite being categorization as a negative phenomenon.

Kerry Keith will examine covert and overt policing and surveillance strategies operationalized after one is released from prison. Troubling the watch tactics imposed through parole, often a site for reformist action, is instead examined as a direct continuation of policed behavioral expectations designed to re-criminate rather than rehabilitate, revealing socio-cultural agnosia which endangers anti-incarceration movements. Keith draws on systems that counter parole’s watch, speculating on possibilities of a non-policed release from prison.

Location: 
NYC
Description/Abstract of your Event: 

Six women directors take their lens up close to women making news in countries riven with conflict and dictatorial regimes, and asks the question when journalists are constantly under threat, what drives these women to do their jobs? Executive Produce Napur Basu worked with women directors from four countries - Illang Quijano(Philippines), Deepika Sharma (India) Pochi Tamba Nsoh (Cameroon) and Eva Brownstein (USA/Bangladesh) who produced films in five countries - Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cameroon, India, Philippines.

As research in action, we wish to use this film as a starting point to open up discussion around the people and the media. The questions of wherein lies our responsibility to the audience/readers and to listen to the people on this question.

Location: 
NYC
Description/Abstract of your Event: 

The purpose of the workshop is to provide instruction on how to craft publicity documents to ensure high media turnout for a political protest. The workshop will also discuss how to create a document that encourages the media to frame the message in the most desirable way. Finally, the workshop will also discuss how to properly conceptualize a political event that meets both the needs of the media as well as current and future political supporters.

Location: 
NYC
Description/Abstract of your Event: 

The central role of rhetorically shaped language in the determination of events has always been a central concern of the humanities. A major strand in literature has always concerned itself with the agency--and its emancipative capacities--associated with access to, and mastery of, literary tradition and its present trajectory. Experimental writers and publishers attempt to extend and re-make old forms and to create new ones as needed in order to bring "news" of the present to themselves and to readers in contemporary language adequate to the history we are living. Increasingly, in the age of Facebook, Google, Amazon, Apple and Goldman Sachs, language seems to be "pasted on" retrospectively to determinations of wealth creation whose violent, for-profit extraction is engineered with algorithms based on market monetizations, globally coordinated and maximized as returns on invested capital, without accountability to a general welfare. With the increasing pre-emption of the determinative role of non-monetized deliberative and imaginative language, what role does the poet, novelist, essayist, and memoirist, and their not-for-profit publishers have on influencing events, including political ones?

A poet and three novelists, all of whom work in book publishing, will discuss how they understand and pursue political agency through both their creative and work lives in the midst of the relentless monetization of all value--including within independent literary presses--that underpins today's financialized global political economy.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

In an age where information is both instantly accessible and easily manipulated, and the U.S. government’s war on whistleblowers and press freedoms continues in full swing, the need for hard-hitting, independent journalism that focuses on social justice and civil liberties is greater than ever.

It is up to those with the skills, platform and reach to ensure that the voices of the marginalized, and the issues that affect millions who live under a constant state of oppression and discrimination, cannot be squelched.

The News Beat podcast works all these angles. A short-form, educational podcast focusing specifically on social justice and civil liberty issues, News Beat’s seasoned journalists interview experts, thought leaders, academics and activists. Those interviews are woven over a bed of highly produced, hip-hop-styled music, while acclaimed independent rap artists craft original lyrics that are interspersed throughout each episode. The result: informative, entertaining and compelling mini audio documentaries -- with a splash of dope beats and rhymes.

Topics covered include the true origins of the racist, ineffective war on drugs, the injustices of the exoneration process for those who have been wrongfully convicted, the fight to close juvenile detention centers, the U.S. government’s war against journalism and press freedom, America’s illegal, perpetual war and more. Guests have included iconic voices such as Dr. Cornel West, Rosa Clemente, Barrett Brown and John Kiriakou.

Our workshop demonstrates the process of creating these groundbreaking, informative episodes -- ideation, interviews, scripting, audio production and lyric creation -- breaking down our unique marriage of traditional journalism, new media and focus on social justice with hip-hop music, culture and spirit.

We look forward to pulling back the curtain on this exciting new method of sharing vital knowledge through hip-hop.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

What do a fake pimp and prostitute have to do with ACORN, America’s largest anti-poverty organization? A power player in the 2008 election of President Barack Obama, community organizing group ACORN was targeted by conservatives, who accused them of committing voter fraud. ACORN critics found allies in amateur journalists James O’Keefe and Hannah Giles whose undercover hidden camera investigations smeared ACORN, and helped launch a new entity called Breitbart Media. ACORN and the Firestorm is a thrilling recount of recent political history by award winning directors, Reuben Atlas (Brothers Hypnotic) and Sam Pollard (Two Trains Runnin’), ACORN became a major player in the 2008 presidential election that resulted in Barack Obama’s victory. Big businesses, Republicans and right-wing activists attacked the group, firing accusations of voter fraud and government waste at the left-
leaning organization. Right-wing opposition found unexpected allies in a pair of amateur journalists who posed as a pimp and prostitute hoping to expose ACORN via hidden-camera. The ensuing political drama spawned the now-omnipresent Breitbart Media, and served as a prescient foreshadowing of today’s political climate. In an age where fake news and truthiness obscure reality, ACORN and the Firestorm tells a deep, true, moving story about what lies beneath a divided America.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

The key to seeking truth is respect for evidence. We address the media's collusion in the theft of the 2016 Democratic nomination from Bernie Sanders, and how this connects to questioning media's coverage of current events Parkland, Vegas, Charlottesville and historic events like 9/11, used to bring the country into dozens of wars. In addition, just just to make sure we will have a lively discussion, we present evidence that AA77 did hit the Pentagon.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

This workshop will ask participants to look at how they focus on their core values while expanding their organizations. What practices do they use to stay intentional when welcoming new alliances to their actions? How does their group convey their values while allowing for difference?

The workshop is participant-oriented. Early exercises determine the issues while the breakout session concentrates on identifying and sharing non-patriarchal solutions. Breakout sessions might include topics such as integration, diversity, limits, inclusion, and others. Time will be left at the end for a summary of solutions!

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

VT Senator Bernie Sanders repeatedly declared during his presidential campaign that the 'The American people are profoundly sick and tired of establishment economics.' Whatever you think about Sanders, this statement nails it. But establishment economics has claws and fights back. Intolerance Economics: Ideology, Competing Visions and Institutional Retaliation will bring into focus the latest resistance to establishment economics and the forces of reaction against change to a long calcified doctrine that has one ideological purpose -- servicing the corporate status quo.

Description/Abstract of your Event: 

We are a theatre/ performance/ creative arts collective based in the US, with many connections globally through friends, family, students, etc. We have an especially strong tie to India, and the struggle for human rights and freedom of expression there. We express ourselves both regionally and internationally, through the United Nations, social media, and the mainstream press. Our goal is to promote democracy and to oppose authoritarian regimes, both in India and in the US, using theatre and visual arts as a weapon.